Monthly Archives: November 2014

Kid’s Crafts: Joy to the World Holiday Banner

Kid’s Crafts: Joy to the World Holiday Banner

CHRISTMAS

As Christianity became the dominant religion in Europe, Christian holidays were held alongside pagan holidays and celebrations.

Christmas has its roots in Yule, the pagan celebration of the winter solstice held in Northern Europe. The ancient Romans also held a winter festival by commemorating the temple of the god Saturn on December 17th. They called it Saturnalia and later extended the holiday festivities from December 17th to December 23rd.

Christmas, celebrated on December 25th, closes the Advent season and begins the twelve days of Christmastide celebrations.

Early Christians adopted pagan customs as well as pagan festivals and celebrations. For example, the Christmas tree is based on the pagan custom of bringing greenery into the house during the winter.

Christians began celebrating Christmas in the 4th century copying the pagans who celebrated the harvest by feasting during the winter solstice. It was a way of livening up the shortest day of the year.

As Christmas became commercialized, various symbols became identified with the holiday: Santa Claus, snow people, angels, pine wreaths, reindeer, stars, horns, the manger, and more.

Joy to the World Banner

Joy to the World Banner

JOY BANNER

Ages: 5 – 12 years     Time: one hour

MATERIALS:

Gold glitter pen                                   white felt square 14” x 20”

Beige pompom                                   Kelly green craft foam sheet.

Beige felt square                                dark green craft foam sheet.

Gold felt square                                  red craft foam sheet.

Red felt square                                   String – double the length of the dowel rod

Dowel rod                                           Pattern (optional)

 

Measure and trim the white square to 14” x 20”. Place the piece vertically. Make a loop by measuring and folding and ironing a 1” seam. Measure and fold a second 1” seam. Iron and glue the second fold. You will be inserting the dowel rod through this loop.

Trace and cut the shapes using templates or stencils or use the patterns provided below. To create the wreath, cut 21 – 22 holly leaves from the Kelly green craft foam sheet and 9 – 10 holly leaves from dark green craft foam sheet. Glue the leaves in a circular arrangement using the top ¾ of the white felt background. Overlap the leaves as you form the design of the wreath.

Trace and cut the bow and letters from the red craft foam sheet. Glue the letters and the bow to the bottom of the wreath.

Trace and cut the angel’s dress out of the red felt, the horn from the gold felt, the wings and face from the beige felt. Glue these pieces in the center of the wreath.

Glue a little moss to form the angel’s hair just below the halo. Glue pompom to show hands and feet. Using the glitter pen, define the angel’s wings and bow.

Cut the dowel rod to about 16”. Insert through the top loop. Cut string to a suitable length. Tie strings to each end of the dowel rod and hang.

Happy Holidays!

Making banners is fun for the family. You can use the banner ideas described here or you can use them as a springboard for your own ideas and designs.

All you need are some basic supplies and a love of making crafts!

Patterns for Winter Banner

Patterns for Winter Banner

Share Button

Drawing the Human Body: Drawing The Human Body in Motion

Drawing the Human Body: Drawing The Human Body in Motion

Exercise Four: Drawing the Human Body in Motion

What you need: pencil, newsprint paper, timer, black and white watercolor paints, narrow and wide soft bristle brushes, clean jar, watercolor paper, water, drawing board or lap desk, masking tape, paper towels, palette, and a model

Time Limit: 60 seconds

Lesson: Complete a drawing of the body in motion.

Materials: pencil, newsprint paper, timer, black and white watercolor paints, narrow and wide soft bristle brushes, clean jar, watercolor paper, water, drawing board or lap desk, masking tape, paper towels, palette

Project: Begin by drawing several quick sketches of the body in motion to loosen up. Set the timer for sixty seconds. Following the first two exercises, complete a drawing of the human body with watercolor paints. It won’t look perfect but it will be a drawing showing the contour of the figure, dark and light and the figure in motion.

Remember to practice, practice, practice!

Share Button

Drawing the Human Body: Study in Dark and Light

Drawing the Human Body: Study in Dark and Light

 

Exercise Three: Dark and Light

The use of light and dark will make the figure you draw look more real or three-dimensional. In the first exercise, you suggested movement. In this exercise, you will draw the illusion of light and dark.
Time Limit: 30 – 60 seconds

What you need: pencil, newsprint paper, timer, black and white watercolor paints, narrow and wide soft bristle brushes, clean jar, watercolor paper, water, drawing board or lap desk, masking tape, paper towels, palette, paper stump (optional) and a model.

Lesson: Light and dark shadows help to define the features on the face and the figure, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the drawing.

Materials: pencil, newsprint paper

Project: Draw the figure utilizing the lessons you previously learned: gesture and contour drawings and uses of dark and light. Draw several quick gesture and contour drawings to warm up. Give yourself 30 seconds. Work quickly. As you draw the model, see where the light hits the face and body of the model. Add the shadows lightly with the pencil. Then press with the pencil in areas that are very dark. You can smooth the transition from light shadow to dark shadow or vice versa with your finger or by using a paper stump. Use your eraser to enhance “white” areas on the paper. Then set the timer for sixty seconds. Repeat the lesson. This time you will have a bit more time to define the figure.

Set the timer. Using the techniques you learned in the previous lesson, draw the figure quickly. Keep your eye on the figure not on the paper. After 30 seconds, stop. Mix black and white to make gray. Dilute it with water and with a broader brush, add shadows just as you see them on the model. Set the timer again. With a clean brush, use white for highlights. After another 30 seconds, stop. Repeat lesson by having the model pose in different ways.

Materials for Alternative Project: watercolor paper, board, brush, black and white watercolor paints, water in a clean jar, paper towels, masking tape, palette

Alternative Project: Tape the watercolor paper to the board. Dip the brush in the clean water and wet the paper. Then thin the black paint with water. Observe where the light hits the face and figure. Then dip the narrow brush into black paint and begin to lay down washes of black paint to create shadows. Wait for the first washes of paint to dry and then add more washes especially in the dark areas.

Share Button

Drawing the Human Body: Contour Drawings

Drawing the Human Body: Contour Drawings

Exercise Two: Contour Drawings
What you need: pencil, newsprint paper, timer, black and white watercolor paints, narrow and wide soft bristle brushes, clean jar, watercolor paper, water, drawing board or lap desk, masking tape, paper towels, palette, and two models.

Time Limit: No time limit

Lesson: Contour drawings enable students to “loosen up.” Looking at the figure and not the drawing forces the student to closely study the model. Contour drawings also reinforce the three-dimensionality of the human body even though the artist is drawing the figure on a flat surface.

Materials: pencil, newsprint paper

Project: Set the timer for three minutes. Draw a standing figure using one continuous line. Do not take your eyes off the model as you draw and do not lift your hand off the paper. Draw a seated figure in the same way, then a close-up of a face and finally, a group of two or more figures. Overlap them in some way: one can stand behind the other or one can lean into the face of the other. Keep on practicing by setting the timer for two minutes and draw the face and figure standing or siting in one continuous stroke; then set the timer for one minute and draw the face and figure as you did above.

Repeating these exercises will give you the confidence to draw the human form with accuracy over time.

Your figures will not look realistic; in fact, they may even look funny!

Share Button

Drawing the Human Body: Gesture Drawing

Drawing the Human Body: Gesture Drawing

 

Exercise One: Gesture Drawing

What you need: pencil, newsprint paper, timer, black and white watercolor paints, narrow and wide soft bristle brushes, clean jar, water, watercolor paper, drawing board or lap desk, masking tape, paper towels, palette, and a model.

Time Limit: 30 to 60 seconds

Lesson: Learn to capture the “gesture” or “pose” of the model

Materials: pencil, newsprint paper

Project: This is an exercise used in drawing classes to help students loosen up but it can also be used to help us learn to draw the human body in motion. Think of the human body as a series of imperfect shapes: circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles first.

Set the timer for thirty seconds. Pose the model in a relaxed sitting position first. The purpose of the lesson is to capture a gesture that suggests movement. Draw the whole figure and draw as quickly as possible. Keep your eyes on the model, not the paper. When the 30 seconds are up, stop. Repeat this process with the model in a standing pose for another 30 seconds. Create other poses for the model: bending down, climbing the stairs, turning the head, carrying books, etc. Practice by drawing many sketches quickly and be sure to keep your eyes on the model, not the paper at all times.

Your drawings won’t be perfect but they will suggest movement.

Share Button
http://amzn.to/2fkf5xC