Monthly Archives: February 2016

Pythagoras and the Number 3

Pythagoras and the Number 3
Number 3

Number 3

The Sketchbook Project “is the world’s largest library of artists’ books…”  The sketchbooks also travel North America and even the world via the Mobile Library. For more information, go to https://www.sketchbookproject.com.

I participated in the Sketchbook Project in 2012 and 2013. It’s time to take part again.  This year’s theme is Numerology and the visual power of numbers and letters and their relationship to each other.

 

“The universe is based on the fundamental reality that all things are related and within that underlying notion of unity, all things are energy.”

from The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Numerology

The Number 3 is the number of enthusiasm, imagination and an optimistic happy spirit. The number 3 represents the trinity in a variety of ways:       

mother, father, child

life, birth,death

past, present, future

To Pythagoras, the mystic, the triangle symbolized the Number 3 which represented the trinity found in the universe. Myths and folk tales have a beginning, middle and an end and often present protagonists with choices: 3 doors, 3 riddles to solve, 3 guesses, 3 doors, 3 chances.

Associated with the Number 3 is the color yellow and the letters C, L and U.

 

For further reading: 

Lagerquist, Kay. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Numerology. Indianapolis, IN: Alpha Books, 1999.

Millman, Don. The Life You Were Born to Live. Tiburon, CA: H. J. Kramer/New World Library, 1993.

 

Pythagoras and Numerology

Numerology studies the meanings of names and numbers and their relationship to each other and has its roots in  the cultures of ancient Greece, China, Rome and Egypt and the Hebrew Kabbalah.

Pythagoras was a Greek mathematician and mystic from the 6th century B.C.E. He is one of the fathers of numerology and regarded as the father of geometry.

He based his system of names and numbers on his belief that nature is composed of numerical relationships. Numbers are a source of form and energy and numbers 1 through 9 represent the nine stages of the cycle of life.

Pythagoras and his followers believed that divine law could be calculated through mathematics.

Pythagoras, however, associated numbers with many ideas not just divine law. For example, he explored musical harmony through mathematics and called his concept “The Music of the Spheres.” Pythagoras believed that everything vibrates to its own special harmony; the higher the vibration, the more (or positive) force it has but the lower the rate of vibration, the less (or negative) force it has.

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The Sketchbook Project: Pythagoras and the Number 2

The Sketchbook Project: Pythagoras and the Number 2
Number 2

Number 2

The Sketchbook Project “is the world’s largest library of artists’ books…”  The sketchbooks also travel North America and even the world via the Mobile Library. For more information, go to https://www.sketchbookproject.com.

I participated in the Sketchbook Project in 2012 and 2013. It’s time to take part again.  This year’s theme is Numerology and the visual power of numbers and letters and their relationship to each other.

 

“The universe is based on the fundamental reality that all things are related and within that underlying notion of unity, all things are energy.”

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Numerology

The Number 2 is the number of cooperation – think team player – and companionship. The number 2 represents balance and harmony. Parallel lines symbolize the duality in the number 2 which also represents the duality found in nature:

day/night

yin/yang

male/female

life/death

positive/negative….

Associated with the Number 2 are the letters B, K and T and the color orange.

 

For further reading: 

Lagerquist, Kay. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Numerology. Indianapolis, IN: Alpha Books, 1999.

Millman, Don. The Life You Were Born to Live. Tiburon, CA: H. J. Kramer/New World Library, 1993.

Pythagoras and Numerology

Numerology studies the meanings of names and numbers and their relationship to each other and has its roots in  the cultures of ancient Greece, China, Rome and Egypt and the Hebrew Kabbalah.

Pythagoras was a Greek mathematician and mystic from the 6th century B.C.E. He is one of the fathers of numerology and regarded as the father of geometry.

He based his system of names and numbers on his belief that nature is composed of numerical relationships. Numbers are a source of form and energy and numbers 1 through 9 represent the nine stages of the cycle of life.

Pythagoras and his followers believed that divine law could be calculated through mathematics.

Pythagoras, however, associated numbers with many ideas not just divine law. For example, he explored musical harmony through mathematics and called his concept “The Music of the Spheres.” Pythagoras believed that everything vibrates to its own special harmony; the higher the vibration, the more (or positive) force it has but the lower the rate of vibration, the less (or negative) force it has.

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The Sketchbook Project: Pythagoras and the Number 1

The Sketchbook Project: Pythagoras and the Number 1
The Number One

The Number One

The Sketchbook Project “is the world’s largest library of artists’ books…”  The sketchbooks also travel North America and even the world via the Mobile Library. For more information, go to https://www.sketchbookproject.com.

I participated in the Sketchbook Project in 2012 and 2013. It’s time to take part again.  This year’s theme is Numerology and the visual power of numbers and letters and their relationship to each other.

 

The number one is the number of new beginnings and new opportunities.  One represents spirit at the

center of all things. The symbol of the number one is the perpendicular line  symbolizing creation, assimilation and expression and  red is the color associated with it. 

Letters are also associated with numbers: A, J and S resonate with the number one.

 

Bibliography:

Lagerquist, Kay. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Numerology. Indianapolis, IN: Alpha Books, 1999.

Hay, Louise L. Colors and Numbers, Your Personal Guide to Positive Vibrations in Daily Life. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, 2010.

Millman, Don. The Life You Were Born to Live. Tiburon, CA: H. J. Kramer/New World Library, 1993.

 

Pythagoras and Numerology

Numerology studies the meanings of names and numbers and their relationship to each other and has its roots in  the cultures of ancient Greece, China, Rome and Egypt and the Hebrew Kabbalah.

Pythagoras was a Greek mathematician and mystic from the 6th century B.C.E. He is one of the fathers of numerology and regarded as the father of geometry.

He based his system of names and numbers on his belief that nature is composed of numerical relationships. Numbers are a source of form and energy and numbers 1 through 9 represent the nine stages of the cycle of life.

Pythagoras and his followers believed that divine law could be calculated through mathematics.

Pythagoras, however, associated numbers with many ideas not just divine law. For example, he explored musical harmony through mathematics and called his concept “The Music of the Spheres.” Pythagoras believed that everything vibrates to its own special harmony; the higher the vibration, the more (or positive) force it has but the lower the rate of vibration, the less (or negative) force it has.

 

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The Pythagoras, Numbers and the Alphabet

The Pythagoras, Numbers and the Alphabet
Sketchbook Project 2016 Beginning Sketch

Sketchbook Project 2016 Beginning Sketch

Pythagoras and Numerology

Numerology studies the meanings of names and numbers and their relationship to each other and derives from the cultures of ancient Greece, China, Rome and Egypt and the Hebrew Kabbalah.

Pythagoras was a Greek mathematician and mystic from the 6th century BCE. Historians regard him as one of the fathers of numerology as well as the father of geometry.

He based his system of names and numbers on his belief that numerical relationships permeate nature. Numbers are a source of form and energy and numbers 1 through 9 represent the nine stages of the cycle of life.

Pythagoras and his followers believed that divine law could be calculated through mathematics.

Pythagoras, however, associated numbers with many ideas not just divine law. For example, he explored musical harmony through mathematics and called his concept “The Music of the Spheres.” Pythagoras believed that everything vibrates to its own special harmony; the higher the vibration, the more (or positive) force it has but the lower the rate of vibration, the less (or negative) force it has.

Numerology studies the meanings of names and numbers and their relationship to each other.

The Sketchbook Project “is the world’s largest library of artists’ books…” The public can view the completed sketchbooks at the Brooklyn Art Library located in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, NY. The sketchbooks also travel North America and even the world via the Mobile Library. For more information, go to https://www.sketchbookproject.com.

I participated in the Sketchbook Project in 2012 and 2013. It’s time to take part again. Over the next several weeks, I will post the designs in the pages of the current sketchbook including cover and end pages. (Click on the art tutorials link above.) This year’s theme is Numerology and the visual power of numbers and letters and their relationship to each other.

Of course there is lots of room for interpretation and agreement or disagreement but have fun with the designs.

Use these designs for inspiration and as a springboard to your own creativity..

The sketchbook will just scratch the surface of the subject.

Bibliography:

Lagerquist, Kay. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Numerology. Indianapolis, IN: Alpha Books, 1999.

Hay, Louise L. Colors and Numbers, Your Personal Guide to Positive Vibrations in Daily Life. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, 2010.

Millman, Don. The Life You Were Born to Live. Tiburon, CA: H. J. Kramer/New World Library, 1993.

Vogel, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey; Mythic Structures for Story tellers and Screenwriters. Studio City, CA: M. Wiese Productions 1998.

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